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Blue River Gutters

Why You Shouldn’t Use Box Gutters For Your Home

What are Box Gutters?

Box gutters are just exactly what they sounds like. They are shaped like a box. There’s not much design to them, not much detail. They’re just built for size and handling water capacity. When you see them, they are usually in a commercial setting strictly for function and almost blend in and look like part of the fascia board. It’s just an extension of that and the front of the gutters will also be flat. Box gutters are usually hand bent brake and installed in 10, 20, and 30 foot sections. That can also be roll-formed.

How Do Box Gutters Work?

Box gutters work in the same way that standard cased out gutters work in that they flow from either left or right going toward the downspout. They are usually installed more level than  K style which is usually pitched about a quarter-inch per 10 foot. You’ll see that box gutters are installed level. However, they work in the same exact way as standard gutters. It’s an eavestrough and then a downspout or outlet to let the water flow out of them.

What is The Difference Between a Box Gutter and More Modern Gutters?

The main difference you will see is first, the size and utility of it. You’ll see the size be one to two times as large as standard K style and the appearance will be much different. Our K style looks like a residential indoor crown molding and you will see that a box gutter has a flat front to it. Almost resembling the fascia board and not having much detail to it at all.

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Blue River Gutters

Our rain gutter specialists have been attaching seamless gutters, gutter guards and accessories for over 20 years. Our customers routinely recommend us for our workmanship.

Box Gutter Durability

Box gutters can be much more durable in the short term because they are usually made of galvanized and are much more rigid than aluminum. They have a shorter lifespan than aluminum because they are subject to rest. The overall size of box gutters start at six inches and can go all the way up to 12-inch which allows them to handle a lot of capacity.

Residential Box Gutters Can Have Too Much Weight

Using this in a residential situation you want to make sure you don’t put too large of a capacity gutter out there on the eaves. Because too much water captured into a gutter system can actually pull down the fascia board on the eave if the gutters were ever to get clogged. You won’t be sure to balance that. Make sure the size is proportionate and you can have a lot more significant weight inside the box gutter. Not only is the material heavier, but the sheer size of them if they ever get stopped up can be really heavy.

Cost Difference Between Box Gutters and Standard Gutters

Box gutters can be two to three times as much as standard K style seamless gutters. It can range from $15 to $30 a linear foot depending on the size and who’s installing it. Whereas standard gutters range from $5 to $10 per linear foot.

Common Problems

Box gutters often look less attractive than more standard gutters. So you’ll see that their appearances have more utility than curb appeal. And another issue with them is their longevity is much shorter because they are subject to rust because they’re made from galvanized.

Conclusion

Use a standard gutter in a residential situation. Box gutters are too heavy and lack curb appeal. They are usually made from galvanized steel, which is unnecessary for the residential setting. A 6 inch or 5 inch K style gutter is more suited and more acceptable for resale for a residential home.

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